Untitled RSS

Archive

Sep
27th
Fri
permalink
albotas:

Giveaway Time: Who Wants A Free Watch?
We’re teaming up with the super rad folks over at Ziiiro to give away their sexy-ass Mercury Black-Ocean timepiece (over a $100 value, son!) to one lucky winner! Follow the rules above and you’re good to go! We can only ship to a U.S. address though, so just keep that in mind.
Also, we’re running this same contest on our semi-new-ish Instagram account, so you should totally go check it out for an extra chance to win.
Good luck, Godspeed, and may The Force be with you, always.

albotas:

Giveaway Time: Who Wants A Free Watch?

We’re teaming up with the super rad folks over at Ziiiro to give away their sexy-ass Mercury Black-Ocean timepiece (over a $100 value, son!) to one lucky winner! Follow the rules above and you’re good to go! We can only ship to a U.S. address though, so just keep that in mind.

Also, we’re running this same contest on our semi-new-ish Instagram account, so you should totally go check it out for an extra chance to win.

Good luck, Godspeed, and may The Force be with you, always.

May
13th
Mon
permalink

Bioshock Infinite

Bioshock Infinite is one of the most enjoyable experiences I’ve had with video games in a while. Aesthetically it is one of the most lovingly crafted game worlds, with professionalism in design throughout and attention to the tiniest of interactions.

Elizabeth is a female protagonist to be proud of, and one that doesn’t require you to escort her or keep her alive. She’ll toss you ammo and health when you need it, and she’ll stare out of a window in an abandoned house while you pillage it for precious supplies. She’ll take a seat when a bench is nearby and lean against the bannister before you ascend the stairs. She is not a love interest, and there are no jokes, analgoies or plot points about her being a woman at all. She’s portrayed as a human being, and perhaps one with more power than meets the eye - but never does her actions remove her from her humanity.

The gameplay is solid enough, it’s a vehicle to keep the ride moving. It’s engaging, fun, and violent. You have magic that the world calls Vigors, and mana called Salts, and nothing feels quite as good in the game as blasting a foe with a flock of crows and then gunning them down with a shotgun. The gameplay could’ve been more fleshed out, but that focus might have meant less emphasis on the superb graphic and aural design throughout the world of Columbia.

Bioshock Infinite is a grand story of science fiction weaved in with evil, good, and everything in between. It champions the heretic, yet points out the similarities between him and a man of God. It’ll define time travel, and alterante universes in a way that might make your head spin, but it won’t betray you or trick your expectations with outrageous plot twists. Oh - and don’t worry - it’ll twist.

The hype is to be believed, and lovers and haters of games should take note. If there is one game you play to show you where video games are today; I think Bioshock Infinite is a fine canidate.

Apr
10th
Wed
permalink
I tried playing Monster Hunter a few years ago when Becca gave me a PSP as a gift. I just didn’t get it. I knew it was popular and I knew a lot of people loved it, but I just couldn’t respect (due to lack of understanding) the game, and I thought it was too hard.

I’ve finally got into Monster Hunter, and it’s one of the most rewarding games I’ve played. I get it. I understand why folks find the games so awesome.

Monster Hunter is a very popular game in Japan, mostly because it has some cool multiplayer that was local-only and given the public transit and just overall population density in Japan it did really well. Monster Hunter definitely has a cult following in the United States, but we’re much more spread out.

Luckily you can play Monster Hunter online these days, but unfortunately I don’t know anyone who plays online! The cool thing is that Becca and I can play together on the same game if we get a Nintendo 3DS, but we’re not purchsing one for a while. Instead I’ve been playing a Monster Hunter game on the PSP, and Becca has been playing Monster Hunter on the Nintendo Wii U.

They’re different versions of the game, but luckily they’re part of the same generation so we can both share stories about the same enemies, similiar areas, and items.

The game is essentially about hunting monsters and gathering items. My game is in Japanese so I have no narrative, and Becca’s is translated which honestly still gives her a weak narrative. The game isn’t played for story though, it’s played for the unique gameplay surrounding completing quests, gathering items, mixing them together to create better items, and of course obtaining, leveling up, and creating new armor sets and weapons. The combat is very realistic, and can be frustrating if you’re used to much easier and forgiving games.

Battles with monsters require you to block, run away, heal, and attack different ways with different ways. It’s all about learning your surroundings, and learning the monster’s behaviors.

The other unique thing about the game is that you aren’t really killing monsters because they’re evil, or controlled by some villain. You’re slaying them because the town and you need to survive. Some monsters are pests and need to be destroyed, but other monsters simply need to be killed to harvest their pelt and meat. You feel bad when you slay a herbivore monster that would never consider attacking you. They flail around and cry out when they die, and then you must carve into them to extract their items.

The game is also incredibly wacky and totally Japanese. You have to cook your meat and the game plays a jingle while cooking to help you not overcook it. The other really rad thing about the games is that you can hire intelligent and brave bipedal cats called Felynes to help you out while questing. They’re like house cats except they can stand up, wear armor, and attack monsters much bigger than themselves. They have unique personalties and you can train and equip them yourself.

I still have so much to learn about Monster Hunter, but it’s been really fun to play and talk about with Becca.

If you have a PSP, a Wii, a 3DS, or a Wii U. I encourage you to try out Monster Hunter.

It’s really fantastic.

I tried playing Monster Hunter a few years ago when Becca gave me a PSP as a gift. I just didn’t get it. I knew it was popular and I knew a lot of people loved it, but I just couldn’t respect (due to lack of understanding) the game, and I thought it was too hard.

I’ve finally got into Monster Hunter, and it’s one of the most rewarding games I’ve played. I get it. I understand why folks find the games so awesome.

Monster Hunter is a very popular game in Japan, mostly because it has some cool multiplayer that was local-only and given the public transit and just overall population density in Japan it did really well. Monster Hunter definitely has a cult following in the United States, but we’re much more spread out.

Luckily you can play Monster Hunter online these days, but unfortunately I don’t know anyone who plays online! The cool thing is that Becca and I can play together on the same game if we get a Nintendo 3DS, but we’re not purchsing one for a while. Instead I’ve been playing a Monster Hunter game on the PSP, and Becca has been playing Monster Hunter on the Nintendo Wii U.

They’re different versions of the game, but luckily they’re part of the same generation so we can both share stories about the same enemies, similiar areas, and items.

The game is essentially about hunting monsters and gathering items. My game is in Japanese so I have no narrative, and Becca’s is translated which honestly still gives her a weak narrative. The game isn’t played for story though, it’s played for the unique gameplay surrounding completing quests, gathering items, mixing them together to create better items, and of course obtaining, leveling up, and creating new armor sets and weapons. The combat is very realistic, and can be frustrating if you’re used to much easier and forgiving games.

Battles with monsters require you to block, run away, heal, and attack different ways with different ways. It’s all about learning your surroundings, and learning the monster’s behaviors.

The other unique thing about the game is that you aren’t really killing monsters because they’re evil, or controlled by some villain. You’re slaying them because the town and you need to survive. Some monsters are pests and need to be destroyed, but other monsters simply need to be killed to harvest their pelt and meat. You feel bad when you slay a herbivore monster that would never consider attacking you. They flail around and cry out when they die, and then you must carve into them to extract their items.

The game is also incredibly wacky and totally Japanese. You have to cook your meat and the game plays a jingle while cooking to help you not overcook it. The other really rad thing about the games is that you can hire intelligent and brave bipedal cats called Felynes to help you out while questing. They’re like house cats except they can stand up, wear armor, and attack monsters much bigger than themselves. They have unique personalties and you can train and equip them yourself.

I still have so much to learn about Monster Hunter, but it’s been really fun to play and talk about with Becca.

If you have a PSP, a Wii, a 3DS, or a Wii U. I encourage you to try out Monster Hunter.

It’s really fantastic.